Montblanc – WRITERS EDITION: HOMAGE TO ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

990,00

Montblanc – WRITERS EDITION: HOMAGE TO ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

FP NIB M 18K
Condition= New
Complete (With outer box, box & papers)

1 in stock

Description

Description

Robert Louis Stevenson, born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1850, had two great desires: for freedom and for the distraction of immersing himself in another world. He composed essays and travel accounts as well as his legendary adventure stories peopled with striking characters whose names send a shiver down the spines of readers around the world: Long John Silver, Captain Flint, Jekyll and Hyde. The Montblanc Writers Edition Homage to Robert Louis Stevenson is dedicated to this imaginative storyteller. The novel “Treasure Island” inspired many design details of the edition. The overall shape of the writing instrument and the rings on the cone combine to create an impression of a historic, extendable spyglass. The black precious resin barrel is decorated with engraved crosses, including a larger “X” like the one marking the location of the treasure on a map. Vertical lines that bring to mind the planks of the schooner “Hispaniola” and a traditional sea chest adorn the cap of the Writers Edition. Behind the platinum-coated clip, the lines converge in a compass rose, while the clip imitates the shape of a belaying pin, to which the lines of a ship’s rigging would be secured. The cap top is crowned by the Montblanc emblem emblazoned with the pirate’s symbol, a skull and crossbones, elevated at its centre. The cap ring is adorned with an engraving of Stevenson’s signature alongside the publication date of his first work “The Pentland Rising”, 1866. The years of Robert Louis Stevenson’s life, 1850-1894, are engraved on the cap. As a reference to Robert Louis Stevenson’s passion for seafaring and his re-settlement in the South Seas, the handcrafted solid Au 750 gold rhodium-coated nib is engraved with fine waves and the title given by the Samoans to the great writer and world traveller, “Tusitala”.